How much SCI in your FI?


I love that YA sci-fi encompasses such a diversity of books, and a diversity of the science within them. Some possess more intense science, some are more soft sci-fi.

CONTROL was written with a very purposeful hand when it came to making the science accurate, or at least believable. Even the world building--things like transportation or growing crops--was carefully thought out. There had to be a reason behind the design, even if I never explain it in the actual book. I spent countless hours refreshing my understanding of genetics, neurobiology, photosynthesis, olfactory physiology...

But at the same time, I also knew I didn't want the science to take over the story.

In the end, CONTROL is simply about a 17 year old girl who's trying to get back what she's lost. And though the science is not a quiet bystander, it's there. Waving its hand, like a total spaz, from a few rows behind my main characters.

So I'm curious. For you sci-fi readers--how much sci do you like in your fi?


16 comments:

Brandon Ax said...

For me it is a matter, how they introduce it. Giant info dumps of science can have me skipping pages, but if done in an interesting way I love the innovation.

Cold As Heaven said...

I like science (my job) and fiction (my hobby), but I don't like sci-fi. The only exception is the Hitchhiker's Guide books that I found quite entertaining >:)

Cold As Heaven

Shelly said...

I am always the one waving back at the spaz behind the main character, so I do like sci with my fi.


Natalie Aguirre said...

I just want enough to make the world make sense. I don't need a lot unless the world needs it. Sounds like you had to do some research into science for yours.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I want enough to be believable but not science-heavy. I don't care how it works - I just want to know that it does.

Kate said...

The science fiction of today is the science fact of tomorrow. I love that SciFi explores ideas and concepts that have yet to happen. For me the science is essential. Obviously I don't want to feel that I'm reading an academic paper - I do enough of that at work, but I do like to see a sound scientific basis to a story. And of course, any science does have to be accurate. :-)

Roland D. Yeomans said...

As a former teacher, I know how the eyes of students (and readers) can glaze over when static science is droned on about.

I try to make the science believable and core to the emotions of the characters at the moment.

Should you portray a bound character but inches away from an injection of a "synaptic solvent" which will reduce her to a drooling vegetable -- if you portray her terror realistically, the reader will buy into the science behind the injection -- even if such a thing would not work in that manner in the real world.

As always an interesting post!

mshatch said...

I've actually done quite a bit of research for my scifi. I poured through Gurps Space, took a course in Astrobiology, and devoted A-Z to all things scifi. The tricky part is not letting the information overwhelm the story.

Elizabeth Seckman said...

You go at everything with such as much creativity as you do the details. I can't wait to read Control. I know it's going to be amazing!

Joshua David Bellin said...

I tend to like my science in science-fiction to be, well, fictional: imaginative, on the outer edge of believability, rather than strictly or literally accurate. But at the same time, it has to be internally consistent, to make sense within the story-world (even if it would make little or no sense in the real world).

Lisa Gail Green said...

I want it to be believable (or at least able to suspend my disbelief) but I'm not overly critical like my hubby the rocket scientist. :P Cant' wait to read CONTROL!

Connie Keller said...

I like a lot of science as long as it's integrated into the plot.

I'm looking forward to reading Control.

LD Masterson said...

I need just enough "sci" to support my suspension of disbelief. Then I'm ready for the "fi".

DL Hammons said...

Believability is key for me, as well as flow. I find that anything that makes me scratch my head too much...is not a good thing. Also, if the author has to slow the pace way down to explain the science...then it takes me out of the story. :)

Leslie S. Rose said...

I love it when grasp-able science concepts are tweaked and enhanced. Bring on flying everyday transports, super plants, holograms, and nano-technology.

Nas said...

While reading I don't want to be lost in Science world. So I just want enough to make it all believable and enjoyable.